Success of online dating sites dating 20 years older than me

New research suggests that one in three Americans now meet their spouses online, and that those marriages are more satisfying and less likely to end in divorce than those that begin in traditional, offline venues.

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Others reported meeting their spouses through social media, chat rooms, and e-mail, among other online venues."What is clear from this research is that a surprising number of Americans now meet their spouse on-line," the research states, and "Meeting a spouse on-line is, on average, associated with slightly higher marital satisfaction and lower rates of marital break-up than meeting a spouse through traditional (off-line) venues."The authors point to previous research that indicates that people may be more honest when interacting online to explain the findings.

Also, the pool of prospective partners is likely larger online, and those on online dating sites may be more focused on finding a long-term mate."It is possible that individuals who met their spouse online may be different in personality, motivation to form a long-term marital relationship, or some other factor,” lead author John Cacioppo said in a press release.

The study notes that the majority of Americans do still meet their spouses offline, though some venues are associated with more satisfying marriages than others.

Those who met in school, at social gatherings or places of worship or grew up together reported greater marital satisfaction than those who met at a bar, work, or on a blind date.

“Marital outcomes are influenced by a variety of factors.

Where one meets their spouse is only one contributing factor, and the effects of where one meets one’s spouse are understandably quite small and do not hold for everyone,” Cacioppo said.“The results of this study are nevertheless encouraging, given the paradigm shift in terms of how Americans are meeting their spouses.”Splitting chores could lead to divorce?According to a Norwegian study released in August 2012, the divorce rate among couples who divvy up household chores is roughly 50 percent higher than for those in which the wife handles the housework.So does that mean couples shouldn't split the chores equally? Researchers say that the higher divorce rate has more to do with "modern" values and attitudes -- such as viewing marriage as less sacred -- rather than a cause-and-effect relationship.Anna Wilkinson has been married for seven years, has two young children, and – although exhausted – is delighted with her lot.“I was 33, had just broken up with my boyfriend and was beginning to think I’d never have a family life.

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